Archive for Frequently asked questions

Can prisoners challenge a penitentiary placement?

Federal prisoners are assessed over several weeks or months after they are transferred to a federal penitentiary. The prisoner’s parole officer then recommends a security classification (minimum, medium, or maximum) and penitentiary to place the prisoner in. The final classification/placement…

What can a prisoner do if denied parole?

In the provincial and federal correctional systems, prisoners can appeal if they are denied parole. The appeal needs to be sent to the Parole Board of Canada’s Appeal Division (for federal prisoners) or to the Chair of the Ontario Parole…

What is accelerated parole review (“APR”)?

Accelerated parole review (“APR”) is a simplified parole review procedure for federal prisoners. It was repealed several years ago, but prisoners may still be eligible if they were sentenced before March 27, 2011. Generally, prisoners have an in-person hearing before…

What is a parole sponsor?

A provincial inmate applying for parole will likely be asked by the Institutional Liaison Officer (“ILO”) and/or the Ontario Parole Board about who the inmate’s sponsor is. A sponsor is the person the inmate will be living with, if granted…

Do inmates need to apply for parole?

Inmates are automatically considered for parole or entitled to a hearing in some cases, but in other cases they need to apply. Regardless, inmates should speak with their Parole Officer or Institutional Liaison Officer about their parole eligibility and ensure…

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